Special Research Program

Computational Immediacy

The SFB Advanced Computational Design funded by the FWF (Austrian Research Fund) connects architecture, computer science, mathematics and engineering in order to develop advanced computational design tools able to incorporate implicit and explicit design knowledge. The SFB is structured into 8 scientific subprojects and combines the Center for Geometry and Computational Design at TU Vienna with researchers at the University of Innsbruck, i.sd_structure and design and TU Graz. This unique combination of scientific disciplines and collaborative research with strong theoretical foundations aims to bring radical innovation in computational design by allowing immediate feedback already in early design phases and by expanding solution spaces by computing design variants that cannot be found by current methods.

The subproject “Computational Immediacy” will be conducted at i.sd, University of Innsbruck / Department of Design by a team of designers, architects and mathematicians led by Kristina Schinegger and Stefan Rutzinger together with Tobias Hell from the Department of Mathematics. The aim is to establish a novel volumetric design method based on 3D point clouds as a design medium that enhance spatial depth of design objects. Focusing on the early design phase and concept modeling, the retrieval of implicit design criteria embedded in 2D images and 3D objects by transfer learning will be exploited. Concept models are an essential medium for exploring vague design ideas and articulating them spatially. Existing modelling frameworks require the designer to choose a geometrical carrier (e.g. NURBS Modelling) for a concept model at a very early stage of design process resulting in a pre-determination of the final output and a reduction of options for the designer. The developed method allows to create concept models through input of 2D reference images or 3D objects in an immediate manner and will assist the designer in his creative, open-ended exploration of the design space.